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UMBC Albin O'Kuhn Library in springtime.

Can you catch a deepfake? UMBC researchers receive NSF award to help people identify audio deepfakes

Vandana Janeja and Christine Mallinson have received a two-year, $300,000 grant from NSF to study deepfakes, focusing on audio clips. Deepfakes are images, videos, and sounds that are developed using artificial intelligence, but that are designed to appear as real-life recordings. They can be highly deceiving for audiences, impacting public opinion and behavior.

A group of women standing outside a building talking.

Women leaders from UMBC, Morgan State, and UMD receive $3M Mellon grant to diversify senior leadership in higher ed

“This experienced team of diverse senior leaders has an opportunity to create a structural answer to elevate diverse leaders from the arts and humanities,” says project PI Kimberly Moffitt, UMBC’s interim dean of CAHSS. “This will enable faculty to apply distinct knowledge, skills, and perspectives to address our communities’ needs as leaders at their respective institutions.”

A man wearing a suit jacket, black tshirt, and jeans stands next to a woman wearing a black, white, gold, and red line pattern. Green trees and a brick building are behind them.

UMBC receives a $1M gift plus $1M in state match to establish the Fred and Virginia Pausch Professorship in Economics

“The process of creating this professorship speaks to the power of collaboration within the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (CAHSS) and across UMBC,” says Kimberly Moffitt, interim dean of CAHSS. “I am excited to partner with donors and other supporters who are so dedicated to building programs that broaden the reach and impact of UMBC’s teaching and research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.”

TEDxUMBC brings community together through “Unmasking Uncertainty”

This fall, the student-organized TEDxUMBC gave ten speakers the opportunity to share their stories, experiences, and expertise with the world. Surprisingly, the theme, “Unmasking Uncertainty,” was actually conceived far before COVID-19 surged globally.

A group of woman of different races and ages stand next to eachother smiling at the camera while holding hard cover picture books in their hands. They are standing in between one white and one yellow standup banner with the words Sherman Center written on them.

UMBC’s Sherman Center for Early Learning in Urban Communities is transforming early childhood education in Maryland

UMBC’s Sherman Center for Early Learning in Urban Communities is now in its third year of supporting, strengthening, and expanding early childhood education in Maryland. The center was founded with the support of a $6 million grant from the George and Betsy Sherman Family Foundation in 2017. It has developed a series of research-based initiatives to address the needs of children from birth to eight years old in Maryland, and the workforce dedicated to educating them.

Black woman with black hair pulled back, wearing glasses, and a pink dress shirt and scarf looks towards the right.

Struggle for justice and change: Karsonya Wise Whitehead presents UMBC’s 42nd annual Du Bois lecture

Whitehead will present on the intersection of COVID-19, systemic racism, and anti-racist action. Her talk, “Black COVID Stories, Black Lives Matter, and Protest: A Conversation about the Ongoing Struggle for Justice and Change,” will examine the long-term societal impacts of today’s conversations about anti-Blackness, anti-racism, policing, and justice in the context of Du Bois’s research.

Rows of international flags hang from a ceiling.

UMBC celebrates 2020 – 2021 Fulbright recipients

Ten recent UMBC alumni are recipients of 2020 – 2021 Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards, including seven from UMBC’s Class of 2020. Each year over 11,000 students apply and just over 2,000 are selected from hundreds of colleges and universities across the United States. The award secures funding for U.S. students to pursue international graduate study, research, internships, or teaching.

UMBC’s Gloria Chuku is named the 2020 – 21 Lipitz Professor for her research on the Igbo people of Nigeria

Gloria Chuku, chair and professor of Africana studies, has been named UMBC’s Lipitz Professor for 2020 – 21. This distinguished professorship recognizes and supports innovative teaching and research. Chuku will carry out research for her new book project, “Becoming Igbo in Nigeria and the Diaspora: A History of Ethnic Identity Formation and Negotiation.”

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