PoliticalScience

A woman and a man celebrate Retriever scholarships at UMBC

Meet a Retriever — Phil Shockley ’04, M.P.P. ’09

Meet Phil Shockley ’04, political science and information systems, M.P.P. ’09. As an undergraduate, he was Student Government Association president and took part in interesting internships, and as an alum and donor he continues to engage and give back to his alma mater. He’s now making a UMBC education even more accessible to others by endowing a scholarship in honor of his parents. Continue Reading Meet a Retriever — Phil Shockley ’04, M.P.P. ’09

10 people in professional clothing pose, smiling at camera in front of GRIT-X 2022 backdrop.

GRIT-X 2022 brings to life the “essence” of UMBC research and creative achievement

Amid a bustling day filled with Homecoming excitement, GRIT-X returned to UMBC this month for its sixth year, delivering a wide-ranging lineup of Retriever excellence in action. Held in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, this year’s GRIT-X was the first for new UMBC President Valerie Sheares Ashby. Enjoying one engaging talk after another, she deemed the event “the essence of UMBC.” Continue Reading GRIT-X 2022 brings to life the “essence” of UMBC research and creative achievement

Two students talking at a desk in a library

U.S. News highlights UMBC’s national leadership in teaching, innovation, diversity

The new 2022–23 U.S. News and World Report Best Colleges undergraduate rankings illustrate why a record number of students chose to call UMBC home this fall. This year’s rankings show UMBC jumping an impressive 25 spots on the list of Best National Universities and appearing on several other prestigious lists, distinguishing the university’s achievements on a national stage.  Continue Reading U.S. News highlights UMBC’s national leadership in teaching, innovation, diversity

A person with cropped blond hair, wearing a grey t-shirt, stands with their arms crossed over their stomach, looking seriously. Democracy.

Americans think they know a lot about politics – and it’s bad for democracy that they’re so often wrong in their confidence

“In recent research, I studied how Americans’ perceptions of their own political knowledge shape their political attitudes,” says Ian Anson, associate professor of political science. “My results show that many Americans think they know much more about politics than they really do. Political overconfidence causes Americans to underestimate the political skill of their peers. And those who believe themselves to be political experts often dismiss the guidance of real experts.” Continue Reading Americans think they know a lot about politics – and it’s bad for democracy that they’re so often wrong in their confidence

A pregnant woman looks down at her belly. anti-abortion

Anti-abortion pregnancy centers will likely outlast the age of Roe – here’s how they’re funded and the services they provide

The anti-abortion movement is often criticized as caring little about these matters. UMBC’s Laura Antkowiak, political science, who has studied the intersections of abortion and social welfare issues, I became intrigued by a large but little-known subset of anti-abortion activists who claimed to support women during pregnancy and after childbirth. Continue Reading Anti-abortion pregnancy centers will likely outlast the age of Roe – here’s how they’re funded and the services they provide

Two people dresses in suits shake hands.

Trump-endorsed candidates would generally win even without his support – and that’s usually the case with all political endorsements

“As a political scientist who studies voting and public opinion, I have my doubts about the true power of Trump’s endorsements,” says Ian Anson, assistant professor of political science at UMBC. “Instead, it is more likely that most of the candidates Trump has chosen to endorse were already on track to win their respective races.” Continue Reading Trump-endorsed candidates would generally win even without his support – and that’s usually the case with all political endorsements

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