PoliticalScience

Advocate for self-discovery and inclusion 

Danylo Leshchyshyn ‘22, history and political science, came to UMBC hoping to receive the support he would need to succeed. He found it in the form of friendly staff members with Student Disability Services, and in strong connections he formed with other students.

An adult with short black hair wearing a light brown sweater stands in front of some trees.

A dancer’s discipline and dedication

“I am driven by knowing that I can help future generations of my family explore what the world has to offer,” says Joshua Gray. “My work can open up opportunities for them and help them look at the world and their experiences in a different way.”

Pamela Bennett

“Parenting in Privilege or Peril,” a new book by UMBC’s Pamela R. Bennett, explores barriers to the “American dream”

The notion of the “American dream”—that hard work can lead to social and economic mobility—has existed in the United States for centuries, and it has been disputed for almost as long. Pamela Bennett’s new book takes on this idea. Bennett, associate professor of public policy, explores some of the social, educational, and economic factors that impact the decisions that middle- and working-class parents make in hopes that their children can attain the “American dream.” 

UMBC’s Haleemat Adekoya receives prestigious Truman Scholarship for education advocacy

In addition to Haleemat Adekoya winning the Truman Scholarship, this is the second time that two UMBC students have been named finalists. “This national recognition highlights the fact that UMBC is indeed a magical place that fosters community leaders and passionate public servants, such as Haleemat,” says Rehman Liaqat ‘22, political science, a fellow finalist.

A group of women standing outside a building talking.

Women leaders from UMBC, Morgan State, and UMD receive $3M Mellon grant to diversify senior leadership in higher ed

“This experienced team of diverse senior leaders has an opportunity to create a structural answer to elevate diverse leaders from the arts and humanities,” says project PI Kimberly Moffitt, UMBC’s interim dean of CAHSS. “This will enable faculty to apply distinct knowledge, skills, and perspectives to address our communities’ needs as leaders at their respective institutions.”

Diagonal wide green lines and thin white lines.

After COVID halted global travel, UMBC’s newest Fulbright Scholars begin their journeys

Senior year ended with a surprising turn of events for Dominique Ross ‘21 and Yianni Karabatis ‘21. Both received prestigious Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards for 2021 – 2022. But, like many Fulbright recipients, their Fulbright experiences were initially stalled due to COVID-19. Now, with immunization and continued mask requirements, international travel is once again possible for Fulbright recipients.

A man wearing a navy blue suit, red tie, white dress shirt, and dark rimmed glasses smiles at camera

UMBC’s Tyson King-Meadows will carry forward commitment to inclusive excellence as dean at UMass Boston

“Whether centered on social justice issues related to the Baltimore Uprising or the racial reckoning after George Floyd’s death, Dr. King-Meadows has consistently encouraged us to do more and do better while continuing to center issues of inclusive excellence and equity,” says Kimberly Moffitt, interim dean of UMBC’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Two students, both wearing masks and graduation regalia, take a selfie. One student is holding a "Congrats Class of 2021" sign.

Graduating with gratitude: UMBC welcomes a new class of alumni

Persistent. Innovative. Determined. These are the words UMBC’s commencement speakers returned to again and again to describe the Class of 2021. And despite a year of challenges—missing family and friends, technological frustrations, life lived through the computer screen—one of the resounding themes of this year’s Commencement ceremonies was gratitude.

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