MeyerhoffScholars

close up of gloved hands manipulating unseen item under a microscope

NIDA EDUCATE program develops the next generation of addiction researchers

In 2021, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) awarded UMBC more than $1 million over five years to create a program specifically for undergraduate scholars interested in research on substance abuse and addiction. A year after the program’s launch, it is thriving as students in fields as diverse as economics, computer science, and chemical engineering find ways to connect their interests to this important topic.

First-generation grad reflects on the power of seeing potential, giving support

“As a first generation college student … I didn’t know if going to graduate school would be possible for me, but people believed in me, saw my potential, and gave me the ability to succeed,” Kaitlynn says Kaitlynn Lilly ’22, mathematics and physics. “Being able to give that back to other people has been really powerful for me and has made my UMBC experience very fulfilling.”

Future engineer helps local students see the possibilities in STEM

“My mom is a teacher at a Title I school. She’s a huge inspiration for me,” says Micah Thorpe ’22, mechanical engineering. “She’s always working to expose her kids to STEM, which encouraged me to do the same—and I realized I could do it here at UMBC.”

Portrait of Favour Nwagugo outdoors on UMBC campus

Finding “true success” by supporting younger students

Favour Nwagugo ’22, biological sciences, is a Meyerhoff Scholar and LSAMP Scholar. From his first semester, he has also been a dedicated volunteer with the CHOICE Program at UMBC, working each week with elementary through high school students.

Passion for interdisciplinary thinking

Arjun Trivedi ‘22, M30, mechanical engineering, is passionate about engineering, computing, and connecting with people outside of his field, who have different perspectives. He wants to learn about what drives them, how they think about the world, and if they have advice that could apply to his experience.

Four UMBC students receive Goldwater Scholarship for STEM research, tying prior record

Four UMBC students have been named 2022-23 Goldwater Scholars, tying the university’s past record, set just last year. This year’s recipients are Christopher Slaughter ‘23, computer engineering; Rachel Myers ‘23, chemical engineering; Tobi Majekodunmi ‘23, mechanical engineering; and D’Juan Moreland ‘23, biological sciences and music. UMBC had more winners this year than any other institution in the state of Maryland. 

Pres. Hrabowski elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering

The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) announced the election of UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III as a member. This prestigious honor recognizes Pres. Hrabowski’s leadership in higher education—serving as president of UMBC for three decades and working to increase diversity in STEM fields, including engineering, at a national level.

Student works in a lab, wearing a face mask and protective globes and coat.

UMBC to launch prestigious Beckman Scholars Program for aspiring M.D./Ph.D.s

“The Beckman Scholars Program at UMBC will serve as a springboard for students from all backgrounds to launch themselves into successful careers as physician scientists. And as Beckman Scholars, they will be surrounded by a community that enables them to explore, challenge themselves, and, yes, sometimes fail—all while feeling supported,” says Dean Bill LaCourse. 

Black woman with long, curly hair smiles while standing next to microscopes in a lab.

Hero of the Year: TIME honors UMBC alum Kizzmekia Corbett, COVID-19 vaccine leader

TIME magazine’s famed Person of the Year issue today announced Kizzmekia Corbett as a Hero of the Year for her leadership in developing the COVID-19 vaccine. “Vaccines have the potential to be the equalizer of health disparities, especially around infectious diseases,” Corbett has said.

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