History

Nancy Pelosi is deciding whether she will visit Taiwan

Why the big fuss over Nancy Pelosi’s possible visit to Taiwan?

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi hasn’t confirmed when – or even if – she is to visit Taiwan. Yet such is the sensitivity over the island’s status that reports of her possible trip have resulted in a warning by China of “serious consequences” and a suggestion by President Joe Biden that the visit was “not a good idea,” writes Meredith Oyen.

Crowds gather at Kaab "the house of God" a large rectangular building with white, brown, and black layers of stone. in Mecca, Saudi Arabia for Hajj,

From caravans to markets, the hajj pilgrimage has always included a commercial component

This year, an estimated 1 million people will perform the hajj, which is considered one of the five pillars in Islam. Chaos ensued in early June 2022 when Saudi Arabia announced a hajj “lottery” for Western pilgrims that made it mandatory for people from Europe, the Americas and Australia to apply for visas through a random draw through the Saudi government-backed website. Under the lottery, only 50,000 permits were allowed from these 50 countries, compared with 25,000 for U.K. Muslims alone in previous years.

Five adults stand outside next to each other on a pathway. Fulbright.

UMBC’s 2022 Fulbright student scholars will travel the world to explore difficult questions

Nine recent UMBC graduates and alumni will soon travel to the UK, El Salvador, Kuwait, France, Colombia, Taiwan, South Korea, and Germany as 2022 Fulbright U.S. Student scholars. They include emerging leaders in education, astrophysics, cybersecurity, human rights, and more, and they are excited to explore difficult questions through fresh perspectives.

Biden on Taiwan: Did he really commit US forces to stopping any invasion by China? An expert explains why, on balance, probably not

The White House has been left scrambling a little after President Joe Biden suggested on May 23, 2022, that the U.S. would intervene militarily should China attempt an invasion of Taiwan. Meredith Oyen, history and Asian studies, helps explain the background to Biden’s comments and untangles what should be read into his remarks – and what shouldn’t.

Advocate for self-discovery and inclusion 

Danylo Leshchyshyn ‘22, history and political science, came to UMBC hoping to receive the support he would need to succeed. He found it in the form of friendly staff members with Student Disability Services, and in strong connections he formed with other students.

A portrait of Derek Musgrove smiling, wearing a blue button down shirt.

New Carnegie Fellow Derek Musgrove examines Black political movements in the U.S., 1980 – 1997

“Dr. Musgrove’s selection for the Carnegie Fellowship is further confirmation of the great work happening in the humanities at UMBC,” says Kimberly Moffitt, dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. “We are appreciative of Carnegie’s recognition of his work and of the human experience during such a moment in history.”

UMBC Responds to Putin’s War in Ukraine

Following Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, the Retriever community has turned to students and faculty to provide insight on the subject, as well as ways to help.

UMBC faculty and staff award recipients place community at the core of their success

At UMBC’s 2022 Presidential Faculty and Staff Awards (PFASA), Tamra Mendelson said she loves “getting to the core of a concept” in her research and teaching. As awardee after awardee addressed the audience, both in person and online, it became clear that all shared the same “core concept” of UMBC: community.

Black and Gold, Through and Through

UMBC’s men’s soccer Associate Head Coach Anthony Adams ’97 is just one of two NCAA Division I program assistants who have reached the quarter-century mark.

|||||

Game Changers

Learning and play can look a lot alike. Both call for creativity, curiosity, practice, and reflection. That’s why some Retrievers are combining the two.

UMBC’s Marjoleine Kars receives the Cundill History Prize and Frederick Douglass Book Prize for “Blood on the River”

Based on a decade of archival research, “Blood on the River: A Chronicle of Mutiny and Freedom on the Wild Coast” tells the story of a nearly successful rebellion of enslaved people just over 250 years ago. UMBC’s Amy Froide, professor and chair of history, shares that Kars is a notable example of the rigorous historical research that thrives at UMBC – meticulously researched and carefully argued scholarship that is beautifully written and accessible to a wide range of audiences.

Scroll to Top