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UMBC experts guide TV viewers through the promises and pitfalls of artificial intelligence

Over the past week, UMBC faculty and students have given primetime TV news watchers in Baltimore a glimpse of the frontiers of artificial intelligence (AI) research. WZJ, Baltimore’s CBS News affiliate, aired the AI series in six segments, four of which featured UMBC researchers. Continue Reading UMBC experts guide TV viewers through the promises and pitfalls of artificial intelligence

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UMBC’s Christopher Slaughter, engineering student with health equity focus, wins prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship

Christopher Slaughter ’23, M31 computer engineering, has won a Gates Cambridge Scholarship to pursue graduate work at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom next fall. “He exemplifies UMBC’s values and the Gates Cambridge vision of preparing leaders who demonstrate not only academic excellence, but also a deep commitment to improving the lives of others,” says UMBC President Valerie Sheares Ashby. Continue Reading UMBC’s Christopher Slaughter, engineering student with health equity focus, wins prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship

Three people work with machinery in a lab. They wear protective glasses and gloves. One wears a sweater reading "UMBC Rerievers."

UMBC researchers listed among the world’s top 2% of most-cited scientists and engineers

More than 40 active UMBC researchers are listed among the top 2% of the world’s most-cited scientists and engineers in an analysis recently published by Elsevier. “This analysis shows that our researchers are truly impacting the scientific community in a significant way,” says Karl V. Steiner, vice president for research and creative achievement. Continue Reading UMBC researchers listed among the world’s top 2% of most-cited scientists and engineers

Three student walk down a sidewalk on campus holding an orange balloon about five feet in diameter tethered by ropes a few feet above their heads.

Getting Your Research Off the Ground—Balloons Give Students New Perspectives

The balloons have been a mystery to much of the campus community for years, with the colorful orbs dotting the campus sky in about the tenth week of almost every semester. But for the students in Charlie Kaylor’s class, the balloons represent a culmination of the knowledge and skills they’ve gained over the preceding 10 weeks, including disciplines like ecology, statistics, botany, and sociology. Continue Reading Getting Your Research Off the Ground—Balloons Give Students New Perspectives

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UMBC’s CyMOT receives $1.2M to expand cyber training for manufacturing workers

UMBC researchers designed the Cybersecurity for Manufacturing Operational Technology (CyMOT) program to help manufacturing professionals grow their cybersecurity skills, protecting the sector from cyber threats and increasing their career opportunities. Now, the program has received significant additional funding to expand its impact. Continue Reading UMBC’s CyMOT receives $1.2M to expand cyber training for manufacturing workers

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GRIT-X 2022 brings to life the “essence” of UMBC research and creative achievement

Amid a bustling day filled with Homecoming excitement, GRIT-X returned to UMBC this month for its sixth year, delivering a wide-ranging lineup of Retriever excellence in action. Held in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, this year’s GRIT-X was the first for new UMBC President Valerie Sheares Ashby. Enjoying one engaging talk after another, she deemed the event “the essence of UMBC.” Continue Reading GRIT-X 2022 brings to life the “essence” of UMBC research and creative achievement

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Ozone and thunderstorms: Two UMBC Ph.D. students receive prestigious NASA grants, mentor undergraduates

Maurice Roots and Kylie Hoffman, UMBC Ph.D. students in atmospheric physics, have received competitive Future Investigators in NASA Earth and Space Science and Technology (FINESST) awards that will support the remainder of their graduate studies. Roots’s research project will focus on air pollution and Hoffman will target thunderstorms, both using remote sensing techniques. Continue Reading Ozone and thunderstorms: Two UMBC Ph.D. students receive prestigious NASA grants, mentor undergraduates

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UMBC’s Anupam Joshi, cybersecurity innovator, to expand leadership impact as 2022–23 ACE Fellow

Anupam Joshi, a professor focused on both high-impact computing research and expanding access to computer science and cybersecurity education, has been named a 2022-23 American Council on Education (ACE) Fellow. He will spend the coming academic year with University System of Maryland (USM) leaders. Continue Reading UMBC’s Anupam Joshi, cybersecurity innovator, to expand leadership impact as 2022–23 ACE Fellow

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Did Twitter ignore basic security measures? A cybersecurity expert explains a whistleblower’s claims

By Richard Forno, Principal Lecturer,Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, UMBC Twitter’s former security chief, Peiter “Mudge” Zatko, filed a whistleblower complaint with the Securities and Exchange Commission in July 2022, accusing the microblogging platform company of serious security failings. The accusations amplified the ongoing drama of Twitter’s potential sale to Elon Musk. Zatko spent decades as an ethical hacker, private researcher, government adviser and executive at some of the most prominent internet companies and government offices. He is practically a legend in the cybersecurity industry. Because of his reputation, when he speaks, people and governments normally listen – which underscores… Continue Reading Did Twitter ignore basic security measures? A cybersecurity expert explains a whistleblower’s claims

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