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An adult with dark hair pulled back wearing a Fuchsia dress jacket and a blouse with Fuchsia flowers stands in front of a tree. Immigrant, UMBC, teenager.

Giving voice to immigrant experiences

“When I arrived in Spain as a teenager, my teachers did not expect me to go to college because I was an immigrant and because I didn’t have the resources to access certain learning opportunities,” says Melisa Argañaraz Gomez, Ph.D. ’22, geography and environmental systems. “Now, as a graduate student in the U.S., remembering my experience as a teenager helps me connect with the students I support and empathize with their lives.”

A portrait of Derek Musgrove smiling, wearing a blue button down shirt.

New Carnegie Fellow Derek Musgrove examines Black political movements in the U.S., 1980 – 1997

“Dr. Musgrove’s selection for the Carnegie Fellowship is further confirmation of the great work happening in the humanities at UMBC,” says Kimberly Moffitt, dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. “We are appreciative of Carnegie’s recognition of his work and of the human experience during such a moment in history.”

Pamela Bennett

“Parenting in Privilege or Peril,” a new book by UMBC’s Pamela R. Bennett, explores barriers to the “American dream”

The notion of the “American dream”—that hard work can lead to social and economic mobility—has existed in the United States for centuries, and it has been disputed for almost as long. Pamela Bennett’s new book takes on this idea. Bennett, associate professor of public policy, explores some of the social, educational, and economic factors that impact the decisions that middle- and working-class parents make in hopes that their children can attain the “American dream.” 

UMBC’s Haleemat Adekoya receives prestigious Truman Scholarship for education advocacy

In addition to Haleemat Adekoya winning the Truman Scholarship, this is the second time that two UMBC students have been named finalists. “This national recognition highlights the fact that UMBC is indeed a magical place that fosters community leaders and passionate public servants, such as Haleemat,” says Rehman Liaqat ‘22, political science, a fellow finalist.

A man wearing a white dress shirt and dark rimmed glasses stands in front of a light brick building.

Smithsonian features Erle Ellis’s research on how humans have shaped ecology over millennia as a top discovery of 2021

“Our work shows that most areas depicted as ‘untouched,’ ‘wild,’ and ‘natural’ are actually areas with long histories of human inhabitation and use,” Ellis previously shared with UMBC News. They might be interpreted like this, he suggests, because in these areas, “societies used their landscapes in ways that sustained most of their native biodiversity and even increased their biodiversity, productivity, and resilience.” 

A woman with long dark hair wearing a white and black striped dress with a brick pillar and tress in the background.

A new approach to environmental research may improve global management of common pool resources

“Monitoring a natural resource or an institution can generate valuable information that will improve governance, but it is necessary to engage decision-makers and the community,” says UMBC’s Maria Bernedo Del Carpio, assistant professor of economics. She and colleagues at other research institutions have conducted a field experiment to isolate one feature of local common pool resource governance: externally supported, technology-facilitated community monitoring.

A woman with long black hair wearing a light pick dress and neclace smiles at camera. There is a white wall in the background.

UMBC’s Mercedez Dunn illuminates marginalized voices to boost equity, from public health to the classroom

“UMBC’s commitment to continue the Postdoctoral Fellowship for Faculty Diversity through the pandemic is one of the reasons I decided to come to UMBC,” says Mercedez Dunn, sociology, anthropology, and public health. Dunn is one of two fellows to join UMBC’s College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences through the high-impact program this fall.

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