CSST

A cloud of grayish-purplish smoke -- like an explosion -- appears on a black background.

UMBC partners in NASA-funded TIGERISS mission to determine source of heavy elements on Earth

“All of that heavier stuff we see here on Earth and throughout the cosmos, like gold, and platinum, and lead—where did it come from, and how did it get distributed?” asks Nicholas Cannady. He serves as operations lead on TIGERISS, a new mission recently funded for up to $20 million over five years, that aims to help answer that question. Continue Reading UMBC partners in NASA-funded TIGERISS mission to determine source of heavy elements on Earth

Two circles, each with many round blobs ranging from blue through green, yellow, and red, based on elevation of the crater. Each circle has a black line traveling from the edge (the pole location 4.25B years ago) to the center (present-day pole).

UMBC’s Viswanathan uses the Moon’s craters to track its shifting poles over 4.25 billion years

To trace the Moon’s poles over time, the research team examined the combined effects of more than 5,000 craters on the Moon’s surface. “All this cratering is like a record” of the Moon’s history, Vishnu Viswanathan says. The team found relatively stable poles over time, which would have created favorable conditions for accumulation of resources like water near the poles. Continue Reading UMBC’s Viswanathan uses the Moon’s craters to track its shifting poles over 4.25 billion years

A large humanmade structure in space, with the edge of Earth visible in the background.

UMBC’s Krizmanic, Cannady contribute to research that adds new wrinkle to understanding the origins of matter in the Milky Way

New research shows that certain elements arrive at Earth from distant parts of the galaxy in different ways. Learning more about how these elements move through the galaxy helps address a fundamental, lingering question in astrophysics: How is matter generated and distributed across the universe? Continue Reading UMBC’s Krizmanic, Cannady contribute to research that adds new wrinkle to understanding the origins of matter in the Milky Way

UMBC to receive over $63 million in NASA renewal of CRESST II space science consortium

NASA has committed $178 million to extend support for the Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science & Technology II (CRESST II), a five-institution research consortium, through 2027. The consortium leverages resources at each institution to develop a diverse talent pipeline in space science and answer big questions about the universe. Continue Reading UMBC to receive over $63 million in NASA renewal of CRESST II space science consortium

Team led by UMBC’s Mehdi Benna is the first to map a planet’s global wind patterns, and they weren’t Earth’s

The research was made possible by “a clever reengineering in flight of how to operate the spacecraft and the instrument,” Mehdi Benna says. “And by doing both—the spacecraft doing something it was not designed to do, and the instrument doing something it was not designed to do—we made the wind measurements possible.” Continue Reading Team led by UMBC’s Mehdi Benna is the first to map a planet’s global wind patterns, and they weren’t Earth’s

Spacecraft and planet

UMBC’s Sander Goossens determines structure of Mercury’s core as part of NASA team

Sander Goossens and his team used their new analysis “to see if there was anything we could say about the planet’s deep interior that people hadn’t been able to say before.” There was: The team discovered the percentage of the planet’s core that was solid versus molten, which provides clues to the evolution process for Mercury and other planets. Continue Reading UMBC’s Sander Goossens determines structure of Mercury’s core as part of NASA team

UMBC astronomer Kenji Hamaguchi confirms binary star system produces cosmic rays

Producing cosmic rays, which also happens following a supernova, requires that particles be accelerated nearly to the speed of light. “We found that the accelerated particles are really energetic, which is much more than we expected from this star,” says Kenji Hamaguchi, the lead author on the study. Continue Reading UMBC astronomer Kenji Hamaguchi confirms binary star system produces cosmic rays

UMBC space scientist further confirms Einstein’s theory through new solar research

To address such big ideas, “You need the solar system as your laboratory,” says Sander Goossens. NASA’s MESSENGER satellite collected data during its years orbiting Mercury that enabled the research team to answer questions about the Sun’s interior processes and our fundamental understanding of gravity. Continue Reading UMBC space scientist further confirms Einstein’s theory through new solar research

GRIT-X talks showcase experiences of outstanding faculty and alumni “from outer space to inner space”

Nine distinguished faculty and alumni shared their stories at GRIT-X, a TED talk-style event during UMBC’s Homecoming that took listeners “from outer space to inner space, from a makerspace to the classroom, from black holes in the universe to a pacemaker for the brain.” Continue Reading GRIT-X talks showcase experiences of outstanding faculty and alumni “from outer space to inner space”

UMBC dedicates new Earth and Space Institute, building on decades of NASA collaboration

NASA has served as “a role model and inspirational force,” that has led people to reach for the stars for generations, shares Dean Bill LaCourse. “The Earth and Space Institute is our opportunity to reach for new heights,” he says. “To take that chance in the name of science, commitment, passion, and basic human curiosity.” Continue Reading UMBC dedicates new Earth and Space Institute, building on decades of NASA collaboration

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