CAHSS

News and Updates about UMBC’s College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Artwork by Vin Grabill, Visual Arts, on Display at MICA

Artwork by Vin Grabill, chair and associate professor of visual arts, is on display at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) through March 11 in an exhibition entitled Under Cover. Grabill’s 2010 video Frontier is among the approximately 50 works of sculpture, photography and video featured in the show, which is a project of MICA’s Exhibition Development Seminar. Professor Grabill was interviewed by WYPR’s Tom Hall for a segment on Maryland Morning that aired on January 31. An audio file of the interview is here.

Eric Dyer, Visual Arts, Receives Grant from Creative Capital

Eric Dyer, associate professor of visual arts, has been awarded a 2012 grant from Creative Capital for his project “Short Ride in a Phat Machine.” Professor Dyer was one of only 56 artists selected out of an applicant pool of 3,247 artists in all 50 states. Creative Capital grants provide up to $50,000 in direct project funds, plus advisory services. Creative Capital is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to providing integrated financial and advisory support to artists pursuing adventurous projects in five disciplines: Emerging Fields, Film/Video, Literature, Performing Arts and Visual Arts.

Public Higher Education Tuition and Enrollment: Lecture by Dave Marcotte (2/10)

Dave Marcotte, UMBC public policy professor and graduate program director, will present the inaugural lecture in this semester’s Research Seminar Seminar Series in Public Policy and Economics this Friday, February 10, at noon in PUP 438.Marcotte’s talk is titled “Public Higher Education Tuition and Enrollment.” His writing on higher education, school closings and test scores has appeared in both academic journals and popular press, such as  the Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Wall Street Journal, Baltimore Sun, Education Week and Inside Higher Education.Additional series speakers this semester include Tara Watson, Williams College (3/9), Tom Vicino, Northeastern University (3/30); Jim Bessen,… Continue Reading Public Higher Education Tuition and Enrollment: Lecture by Dave Marcotte (2/10)

Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, in India’s Telegraph

Ellen Handler Spitz, honors college professor of visual arts, recently visited India, where her activities included reading books to children at the SAI International School.  Her visit was covered in the Telegraph newspaper. “Imagination is a conscious activity that requires a great amount of focus and concentration. Storytelling can create a number of scenarios and possibilities. It can make the impossible possible. For example, our storybooks have animals talking, people talking, things vanishing and so on. But my aim was not to teach children to live in a fantasyland. I told them about humanitarian values, something that can help them… Continue Reading Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, in India’s Telegraph

Jessica Berman, English, Publishes New Book

English Chair Jessica Berman’s newest book, Modernist Commitments: Ethics, Politics, and Transnational Modernism, is now available from Columbia University Press. In this book, Berman demonstrates how modernist narrative connects ethical attitudes and responsibilities to the active creation of political relationships and the way we imagine justice. She challenges divisions between “modernist” and “committed” writing, arguing that a continuum of political engagement undergirds modernisms worldwide and that it is strengthened rather than hindered by formal experimentation.

Greg Ealick, Philosophy, on Patch.com

“Are pet owners, activists and business owners increasingly at odds over how we acquire our pets?” asks a recent article on the website Patch.com Philosophy instructor Greg Ealick wondered if “the increasing hostility we see in pet rearing is an echo of the increasing hostility in child rearing.” The column, “Have ‘Mommy Wars’ Given Way to ‘Pet Wars?’” appeared on the website on February 3.  It is part of a series of posts examining the morality behind how we get our pets.

Nicole King, American Studies, to Present at “Baltimore History Evening” (2/16)

On February 16, Nicole King, assistant professor of American studies, will present “Mapping Baybrook: Environmental Justice in Industrial South Baltimore” as part of a series of “Baltimore History Evenings” at the Village Learning Place, co-sponsored by the Baltimore Historical Society. King will discuss the history of the communities that make up Far South Baltimore, several of which no longer exist as residential areas. She is currently working with UMBC’s Imaging Research Center on a digital component to this research project. There is no charge, but contributions to the Village Learning Place are encouraged. The Village Learning Place is located at 2521… Continue Reading Nicole King, American Studies, to Present at “Baltimore History Evening” (2/16)

Jessica Berman, English, Publishes Book

Jessica Berman, Associate Professor and Chair of English, has just published a book, Modernist Commitments: Ethics, Politics and Transnational Modernism. In the book Berman explores how modernist narrative connects ethical attitudes and responsibilities to the active creation of political relationships and the way we imagine justice. She challenges divisions between “modernist” and “committed” writing, arguing that a continuum of political engagement undergirds modernisms worldwide and that it is strengthened rather than hindered by formal experimentation. The book also makes the case for an expanded, transnational model of literary modernism. Modernist Commitments is part of the Modernist Latitudes book series from… Continue Reading Jessica Berman, English, Publishes Book

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Salon

As GOP presidential candidates vie for support in Florida, immigration politics and the fight for the Latino vote have moved front-and-center, notes UMBC political science professor Thomas Schaller in Salon. He writes, “onstage at the University of North Florida, Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich…went after each other with obvious, mutual disdain on immigration, the subject of the opening question and nearly the full first half-hour of the debate.” Schaller suggests that the challenge for GOP candidates is to “appease xenophobes within their base during the primaries” without alienating the Latino voters they will need to remain competitive in swing states… Continue Reading Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Salon

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Salon and the Baltimore Sun

UMBC political science professor Thomas Schaller continues his commentary on the presidential election today with new columns in Salon and the Baltimore Sun. In “Obama takes his case to the swing states,” Schaller explores the implications of the president’s post-State of the Union speaking tour. Schaller writes, “For the past three months, political eyes have been focused squarely on the Republican White House contenders. But after his State of the Union speech, the commander-in-chief shifts himself into campaigner-in-chief mode, whether or not the GOP has settled on a candidate yet.” Schaller’s latest Baltimore Sun column explores the GOP field, arguing… Continue Reading Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Salon and the Baltimore Sun

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, on Current TV and The Daily Beast

UMBC political science professor and national political commentator Thomas Schaller appeared on CurrentTV’s “Young Turks” show last night, weighing in on the question “Should liberals root for Mitt Romney or Newt Gingrich?” Schaller suggested, “Newt will get the base fired up, but… a vote cast with intensity counts the same as a vote cast reluctantly. It doesn’t matter how juiced up the conservative id is. The votes in the middle are going to matter.”Schaller also weighed in on the GOP candidates’ abilities to collect delegates, in The Daily Beast‘s primary coverage. Whereas neither Gingrich nor Santorum will appear on the… Continue Reading Thomas Schaller, Political Science, on Current TV and The Daily Beast

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Salon

“This year, Barack Obama may become America’s first billion-dollar candidate. […] Can he do it and, more to the point, will he even need all that much cash?” This is the question UMBC political science professor Thomas Schaller asks in his latest Salon article “The Obillionaire candidate.”Schaller compares in detail the Obama campaign’s fundraising in 2007-08 versus 2011 and finds that the evidence he’ll hit new record is mixed. Further, Schaller writes, “the $1 billion goal creates something of a dilemma for Obama’s reelection campaign” at a time when the public is increasingly concerned with income inequality and campaign financing… Continue Reading Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Salon

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