Policy & Society

Christopher Corbett, English, in Style Magazine

“‘The Amiable Baltimoreans’ was published in 1951—just 60 years ago—and yet the city contained within it is as remote from our time as Carthage, and as alluring as the Seven Cities of Cibola,” writes Christopher Corbett, professor of the practice of English, in his latest essay for Style magazine. “This little book does not merely make me wonder where the amiable Baltimoreans have gone and if there are any about now,” he continues. “It makes me long for the tables they set, and lament that it is no longer possible to savor such cuisine.” “Appetite for the Past,” Corbett’s lament… Continue Reading Christopher Corbett, English, in Style Magazine

Quality Assisted Living: A New Book from UMBC’s Center for Aging Studies

Today, 75 million baby boomers are poised to become the next generation of assisted living residents. The sheer size of this population emphasizes the importance of creating, sustaining and evaluating quality in these settings to ensure that elders can access housing that fits their wants and needs. With this in mind, a team of researchers at the UMBC Center for Aging Studies has published “Quality Assisted Living.” This innovate volume explicitly delves into the lives of those who inhabit assisted living facilities, seeking to understand their perceptions of what constitutes quality of life. Looking for a high quality assisted living… Continue Reading Quality Assisted Living: A New Book from UMBC’s Center for Aging Studies

Donald Norris, Public Policy, in the Baltimore Sun

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake had raised $1.4 million this year, the Baltimore Sun reported Tuesday, more than all her opponents combined and enough, according to her campaign, to fund an aggressive television campaign in the Baltimore mayoral race’s final weeks. But Donald Norris, chair of public policy, argues that now is not the time for her to relax if she wants to win re-election. “No matter what the poll numbers, no candidate, whether incumbent or challenger, can take their campaign for granted,” Norris said. “She’s got to raise money, and she’s got to campaign.” Norris also notes, however, that Rawlings-Blake’s… Continue Reading Donald Norris, Public Policy, in the Baltimore Sun

Omar Bukhari ’13, Biochemistry, in the Gazette

Omar Bukhari ’13, biochemistry and EHS, will soon begin his junior year at UMBC, but for the last several weeks he’s been hard at work for another cause. Bukhari just finished a 4,000 mile bike ride from Baltimore to San Francisco through 4K for Cancer, fundraising and meeting cancer patients and their families across the country. Working as a volunteer EMT in Baltimore and hearing patients’ stories about cancer, as well as researching anti-cancer compounds as an intern, motivated Bukhari to become involved with 4K for Cancer. He documented his journey at omar4k.tumblr.com and since returning home has been featured… Continue Reading Omar Bukhari ’13, Biochemistry, in the Gazette

Piotr Gwiazda, English, in the Times Literary Supplement

Piotr Gwiazda, associate professor of English, has published a review in the Times Literary Supplement. Gwiazda says that in his new book, “Unseen Hand” (translated by Clare Cavanagh), Polish poet Adam Zagajewski “shares his fascination with transience and metamorphosis” and “celebrate[s] the twofold pleasures of recollection and meditation” “Now in his sixties, [Zagajewski] finds solace in the world’s capacity for self-renewal,” Gwiazda writes, noting that “realm, often epitomized by the change of seasons or images of birds and trees, serves as the gateway to epiphany.”

Dennis Coates, Economics, in AP

Councilman William Cole argues that the Grand Prix will change how people view Baltimore and Tom Noonan, president and CEO of Visit Baltimore, hopes it will draw 100,000 visitors to the city, but Dennis Coates, professor of economics, suggests the economic benefits of the event are far from certain. “If you think the goal of government is to convince people that they live in a quote-unquote world-class city—whatever that means—then it will probably be a success,” he told the AP. “Will people have a good time? No doubt about it. But in terms of actually creating jobs, creating a better… Continue Reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in AP

David Salkever, Public Policy, in the NY Times

“Fear-inspired hyperbole about the so-called ‘debt crisis’ and ‘explosion of government spending’ has twisted the public discourse about fiscal policy,” argues David Salkever, professor of public policy, in the New York Times. “The upshot is a feeling that our long-range fiscal problems must be solved today, lest we descend into ‘ruin’ (as Jeffrey Manns warned in an August 10 Op-Ed article).” Salkever has been a health policy researcher for three decades, focusing on determinants and regulation of hospital cost inflation, access to health care for the urban poor, economic impacts of children’s disabilities and public benefit activities of non-profit hospitals.… Continue Reading David Salkever, Public Policy, in the NY Times

Will Redman ’98, Music, in the Baltimore Sun

Composer Will Redman ’98, music, was profiled by Tim Smith in the Baltimore Sun. He went to University of Maryland, Baltimore County to study percussion with notable composer and percussionist Stuart Saunders Smith, who encouraged his student to listen to recordings of jazz pioneer John Coltrane and pathbreaking 20th-century classical composer Luciano Berio. “I didn’t know anything about avant-garde music or free jazz,” Redman said. “I decided I needed to do both things. I thought of free jazz as sort of like the punk-rock of jazz.”

Nancy Rankie Shelton, Education, in Maryland Family Magazine

For some students it’s third grade, for others it’s sixth, and for others it is completely different, but it’s a problem each child encounters at some point in his or her education: a grade that they find uncommonly challenging. Maryland Family Magazine recently reported on the problems children face when a class challenges them an August 15 story entitled “The Grueling Grades.” What makes a grade tough ranges from lengthy writing assignments to hours of homework. Nancy Rankie Shelton, an associate professor of education, argues that a focus on testing may be part of the problem. “With the focus on… Continue Reading Nancy Rankie Shelton, Education, in Maryland Family Magazine

Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in the Baltimore Sun and Sabato’s Crystal Ball

In a new column on the popular U.S. politics blog Sabato’s Crystal Ball, UMBC professor Thomas Schaller considers the electoral chances of 2012 presidential hopefuls from the U.S. House of Representatives, given that the last incumbent House member to win the presidency was James Garfield in 1880. In “From the House to the White House? Not So Fast,” Schaller examines past election data and finds, “Despite some significant and even historic House presidential candidates, there is no modern precedent for the Bachmann-Gingrich-McCotter-Paul quartet running in the same cycle for the same party’s presidential nomination.” In the end, he argues, “none… Continue Reading Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in the Baltimore Sun and Sabato’s Crystal Ball

The Constitution and Civil Rights: The Search for Equality in a Multi-Racial America (9/12)

The Social Sciences Forum fall 2011 lecture series presents Jane Junn, professor of political science at the University of Southern California, Monday, September 12, 4 p.m. on the seventh floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library. The Constitution Day lecture, “The Constitution and Civil Rights: The Search for Equality in a Multi-Racial America,” is co-sponsored by the Departments of Political Science, Public Policy, Sociology and Anthropology and the Honors College. The Social Sciences Forum presents topics and perspectives of vital interest to the social sciences community and beyond. Lectures are free and open to the public and will last approximately… Continue Reading The Constitution and Civil Rights: The Search for Equality in a Multi-Racial America (9/12)

Rebecca Boehling, History, to Read at Pratt Library (2/22)

Rebecca Boehling, professor of history and the director of the Dresher Center for the Humanities, will read from her recent book, Life and Loss in the Shadow of the Holocaust: A Jewish Family’s Untold Story at Baltimore’s Pratt Library on Wednesday, February 22.  The discussion, which will also feature Boehling’s co-author, Uta Larkey, is part of the Schapiro Lecture Series, which is sponsored by a bequest from Gloria Schapiro.Based on letters discovered by Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, professor of biology, Life and Loss in the Shadow of the Holocaust reveals a Jewish family’s struggle over whether to leave Nazi Germany while confronting… Continue Reading Rebecca Boehling, History, to Read at Pratt Library (2/22)

Scroll to Top